Postal Clerk Info
Clerk Mileage

Q. Do I get mileage for driving to and from my duty station?

A. No. Driving to and from work is a normal part of employment.

Q. Do I get mileage for using my personally owned vehicle for things like driving between offices {when I am expected to drive to the second office and start working without at least a one hour break in service}, delivering Express Mail, transporting missent Mail, etc?

A. Yes, you are entitled to mileage whenever you use your personally owned vehicle for the business purposes of USPS {assuming no government vehicle is available for you to use}.

Handbook F-15:
5-5.2.1.1
If No Postal Service or GSA Vehicle Is Available

5-5.2.1.1.1
Mileage and Travel Time
If no Postal Service or GSA vehicle is available, you can be reimbursed for all mileage incurred for official business. Use odometer readings or standard mileage guides to determine the number of miles.
Travel time is the reasonable driving time for the distance you traveled

APWU Contract Article 36.2.B

B. Employees will be paid a mileage allowance for the use of privately owned automobiles for travel on official business when authorized by the Employer equal to the standard mileage rate for use of a privately owned automobile as authorized by the General Services Administration (GSA). Any change in the GSA standard mileage rate for use of a privately owned automobile will be put into effect by the Employer within sixty (60) days of the effective date of the GSA change.

Q. How do I get paid for mileage when I work in another office?

A. 1. When reporting to a temporary duty station at the beginning of the day, you would be reimbursed for the difference in mileage between the permanent duty station and the temporary duty station {if the temporary is farther}.

Handbook F-15 7-1.1.1.2 "d. Mileage. When it is advantageous to the Postal Service, you may be authorized to depart directly from and return directly to your home. The Postal Service may reimburse you for any mileage that exceeds the distance between your home and your permanent duty station. If the mileage is less than that between your home and your permanent duty station, you may not claim a mileage reimbursement. You may claim out-of-pocket expenses such as tolls, parking, etc. Use the formula below to calculate the amount for which you may be reimbursed.

Mileage from home to temporary duty station
-
Mileage from home to permanent duty station
Allowable mileage
x
Standard mileage rate from Appendix A
Amount you may claim for reimbursement"

2. If you are required to report to another duty station, and there is no break in service of at least one hour {not including the travel time}you get the mileage driven between the two offices.

3. If you report to your permanent duty station, and are required to punch off the clock and go to a temporary duty station, and there is a break in service {split shift} you get reimbursed as noted in number 1.

Q. Do I get mileage if I volunteer to go to another office?

A. Yes. If you use your personal vehicle for USPS business purposes you can claim mileage, regardless of whether you voluteered, or were "forced" to travel.

Settlement Agreement

Information supplied to Postmasters by the e-travel coordinator of a certain district:

"Subject: mileage

I will attempt to put this issue to rest....

PMR's are entitled to mileage just the same as clerks are entitled to mileage. Employee classification does not dictate different travel policies. Below are the 4 scenarios I shared at the recent PM training last Friday. Whether an employee is 'forced' to work somewhere or 'volunteers' does not change the travel policy. It is an employee in the performance of their duties. They are not arbitrarily driving around the district looking for work. They are reporting to an office because there is work there for them.

Traveling to and from work {permanent duty station} when using your privately owned vehicle is not reimbursable, as it is part of normal employment.

The following scenarios I hope will help. All of them are under assumption the employee is using their privately owned vehicle and are a postal employee.

SCENARIO #1

If an employee is asked to report to a temporary duty station at the beginning of the day, they would be reimbursed the difference between their permanent duty station and the temporary station, if the temporary is farther. If the temporary station is closer, no reimbursement is required.

SCENARIO #2

If an employee is required to travel to another work location after reporting to their permanent duty station, where the employee is expected to be there ASAP, and no lunch period is included, the employee would be reimbursed for the mileage between the two locations.

SCENARIO #3

If an employee reports to their permanent duty station and is required to take a lunch period any mileage traveled during that time is not reimbursable.

SCENARIO #4

If an employee reports to their permanent duty station and is required to punch off the clock and report to a different duty station, in which the normal meal period is included, the employee will be reimbursed as stated in scenario 1.

SPLIT SHIFTS: If an employee reports to an office other than their home office and they are scheduled for a split shift {i.e. 8-10 am and 2-5 pm}, they are only reimbursed mileage for one trip to/from that office, less their daily commute. What they do between 10 and 2 is their business and we do not reimburse for interim mileage. It is the responsibility of the employee's home office PM/Supervisor to confirm all mileage being claimed is acurate prior to signing the PS-1164-E."

Please note that although this information is presented in question and answer format it is not a Q&A document agreed on between the union and usps. It is in this format to answer questions as often presented by clerks on social media and internet forums. References are included to the elm manual and contract for clerks to use in discussing the matters and possibly filing grievances.